Spinner

Boy George Talks to AOL Music about Prison, Addiction and Sampling Obama

Photo: Courtesy of AOL



Over his 30-year career — from an abortive stint with Bow Wow Wow to huge transatlantic success with Culture Club to a chameleonic solo career — Boy George has rarely been out of the headlines. In recent years, run-ins with the law have eclipsed his music, but with his new Kinky Roland-produced dance album ‘Ordinary Alien,’ two Caribbean-flavoured singles (‘Pentonville Blues’ with Glide and Swerve, ‘Somebody to Love Me’ with Mark Ronson) and an impending Culture Club reunion, the former George O’Dowd is enjoying a musical rebirth.




George recently spoke to AOL Music’s Spinner about getting clean, surviving prison, resuming work and coming to terms with his past.

 ABOUT BEING CALLED AN ’80s STAR:
“It used to get on my nerves, now I don’t care anymore.”
ABOUT BEING IN PRISON:
“It was like being back at school — and at 48, that’s quite daunting. You have two choices when you’re in any situation: You either deal with it or you remove yourself from it. Unfortunately, when you’re in prison, you can’t remove yourself from the situation, so the only thing you have control over is how you feel. Luckily for me, when I went to prison I was already sober, so I went with a really strong head. That was very helpful to me.”
ABOUT BOY GEORGE THE PERSON VS. BOY GEORGE THE PERFORMER
” As I’ve gotten older, I’ve become much more comfortable with me. Most of the time I’m not dressed up; I’m not in character. What I realize now is that there is a responsibility that comes with being that person. And although I know that person is me, people treat that person differently because he’s got a hat on and makeup and silly clothes!” More story and videos>>
Ordinary Alien
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